A Canadian Perspective on Combatting Hate Crime under the Rule of Law

November 16, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (PST)

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In honour of the Department of Justice’s Victims and Survivors of Crime Week, the International Centre for Criminal Law Reform and Criminal Justice Policy (ICCLR) is pleased to announce a national webinar presentation that will explore key issues regarding the rise in hate crimes in Canada, the challenges involved in defining hate crime and gathering effective data used to inform practice and policy. The presentation will also examine hate crime enforcement and prosecution policies and discuss the importance of building the capacity of community-based organizations that align with the specific needs of hate crime victims and their communities in order to promote a safer and supportive environment for communities at risk of crimes motivated by hate.

Moderator:

Prof. Maureen Maloney, QC, former Deputy Minister to the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General of the Province of British Columbia. Maureen Maloney is a professor at the Simon Fraser University School of Public Policy. Her teaching and research interests relate to justice systems, international human rights, and conflict management /resolution. Previously, she was Chair in Law and Public Policy and Director of the Institute for Dispute Resolution at the University of Victoria ( 2000-2010). This followed a term as Deputy Minister to the Attorney General (1993 to 2000) and Deputy Attorney General (1997 to 2000) of the Province of British Columbia. Before assuming these positions, Prof. Maloney was the first female Dean of Law in British Columbia. Professor Maloney is actively involved in international governance, dispute resolution and human rights projects in South-East Asia, Iraq, China, Brazil, Guatemala and South Africa. She has been a board member of the International Commission of Jurists (Canadian Section) and is a member of the Education and Training Committee of the Foundation for International Commercial Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution (The Hague). She was a board member of the Canadian Human Rights Foundation and has also served as a member of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.

Panelists:

Stephen Camp, Past President and Current Member of the Alberta Hate Crimes Committee. To read his report, please visit here: Incorporating a Standalone Hate Crime Section into the Criminal Code of Canada.

Amy Go is the President of Chinese Canadian National Council for Social Justice. Chinese Canadian National Council educates, engages, and advocates for social justice and equity for all in Canada www.ccncsj.ca.  CCNC-SJ has been at the forefront of the movement to combat rising ant-Asian racism since January 2020.

Amy is a social worker by training and has dedicated her professional career to serving immigrants and seniors, promoting, and advocating for culturally and linguistically appropriate care and health equity for racialized communities. For over three decades, Amy has advocated for social justice and rights of women and racialized communities through her leadership role in national, provincial, and local service and advocacy organizations. Amy is currently providing consulting services to facilitate organizational strategic development, program planning, development, and review as well as anti-racism/anti-oppression organizational change.

Dr. Susan McDonald is a lawyer and holds a PhD in Education from the University of Toronto where she researched the impact of trauma on immigrant women leaving intimate partner violence and how they learned about the law. She has been with the Department of Justice Canada since 2001 when she joined the federal public service and is currently Principal Researcher with the Research and Statistics Division. In this role, she manages a team of researchers and is responsible for research on access to justice, victims of crime, hate crimes, gender and other files. Susan lives in Ottawa with her partner, three teenaged sons and three cats and loves to build dollhouses. The PPT presentation for Dr. Susan McDonald is available here: Hate Crime Research.

Dr. Barbara Perry is a Professor in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at Ontario Tech University, and the Director of the Centre on Hate, Bias and Extremism. She has written extensively on social justice generally, and hate crime and right-wing extremism specifically. She has published several books spanning both areas, including Diversity, Crime and Justice in Canada, and In the Name of Hate: Understanding Hate Crime. She was the General Editor of a five volume set on hate crime (Praeger), and editor of Volume 3: Victims of Hate Crime of that set. In 2019, she published Right-wing Extremism in Canada, with co-author Ryan Scrivens. Her work has been published in journals representing diverse disciplines: Theoretical Criminology, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Journal of History and Politics, and American Indian Quarterly. Dr. Perry continues to work in the area of hate crime, and has made substantial contributions to the limited scholarship on hate crime in Canada, including work on anti-Muslim violence, antisemitic hate crime, hate crime against 2SLGBTQI communities, the community impacts of hate crime, and right-wing extremism in Canada. She is regularly called upon by policy makers, practitioners, and local, national and international media as an expert on hate crime and right-wing extremism.

Corporal Anthony Statham, RCMP BC Hate Crimes, E Division Major Crimes Section

Trevor Shaw is the Director of Criminal Appeals and Special Prosecutions, BC Prosecution Service, British Columbia Ministry of Attorney General. He was counsel for the AGBC in the Cody case, decided by the Supreme Court of Canada in the aftermath of Jordan. He is a graduate of Queen’s University and the University of Paris II (Pantheon-Assas). He was a law clerk at the Ontario Court (General Division) and the Supreme Court of Canada before becoming a prosecutor in 1995 with Crown Law Office-Criminal in Toronto. He moved to British Columbia in 2006. In 2011, he worked as a consultant for the Office of Legal Affairs, at INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon, France. With the Justice Education Society, he works on a regular basis with judges and prosecutors in Central America to improve their criminal justice systems.

Dr. Vincent Cheng Yang is a Senior Associate of ICCLR.  He earned a Ph.D. in Criminology from SFU in 1996 and a LL.M in Shanghai in 1984. Before his return to Canada and rejoined ICCLR in 2018, he was Professor of Law, Pro-Rector and Vice Rector at University of Saint Joseph in Macau. From 1984 to 2018, he taught law and criminal justice in several universities in mainland China and Macau. He was called to the Bar in Shanghai in 1985 and practiced law in China from 1985-1990. Prof. Yang has been vigorously working on the promotion international standards and the sharing of Canadian best practices to protect human rights and uphold the rule of law in criminal justice overseas since 1995. He was China Program Director at ICCLR during 1995-2010, Advisor for the Canadian Bar Association in 2003-2006, International Expert for the UN Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights in 2002-2005, expert member of the Government of Canada delegation to the Canada-China Human Rights Dialogues, UNDP instructor for its legal aid training project in China and corrections law project in Vietnam, visiting scholar in Cambridge University in 1986-1987 and 1990, and is recognized by the Federal Court of Canada and Immigration and Refugee Board as an expert of Chinese criminal law. In Vancouver, he is board member of Stop Racism Alliance and has often talked to the Chinese Canadian community and the press on issues of anti-Asian hate crime in recent years. To read Dr. Vincent Yang’s outline, visit here: Combatting Anti-Asian Hate Crimes under the Rule of Law.

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The Ripple Effect of Hate Crimes: Addressing the Needs of Victims and Victimized Communities in British Columbia

November 18, 2021 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. (PST)

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This educational webinar is focused on highlighting various victim service models for victims of hate crimes, and the ways in which these models have addressed or can address the ripple effect of hate crimes on the victimized community. Through a victim-centered approach, the webinar will examine the pandemic-driven hate crime experiences of vulnerable communities and applies an intersectional understanding of the impact of hate crimes on individuals and their communities. The webinar will also focus on good practices to coordinate and advance policies in improving coordination and collaboration between law enforcement, prosecution and the community to build safer communities and to provide better support for primary and secondary victims of hate crime. In honour of DOJ’s Victims and Survivors of Crime Week, this webinar is intended for a multi-disciplinary audience, including victims of hate crimes, law enforcement officers, victim advocates, and community-based organizations among others from British Columbia.

Moderator:

David Winkler, QC, Senior Associate, International Centre for Criminal Law Reform and Criminal Justice Policy. Called to the Bar of BC in 1968. Prosecuted for the City of Vancouver and the BC Attorney General Ministry Criminal Justice Branch (CJB) in all levels of court. Occupied various administrative positions within the CJB including Senior Administrator for prosecutions in the Superior Courts, Regional Crown Counsel and Director of Policy and Legislation. Appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1999. Was a member of the CCSO, the Federal, Provincial, Territorial Committee of Senior Officials responsible for coordinating inter-governmental activities relating to legal policy and legislation. Was a BC representative at the Uniform Law Conference of Canada and president of the Criminal Section. Appointed ADM Policy Planning and Legislation for BC AG and SG 2002-2004. After leaving government was a member of the CIDA sponsored ICCLR China project, a venture with the Chinese Prosecution service and carried out contracts with several Canadian prosecution Services. Former President of the BC Association of Police Boards.

Panelists:

Councillor Chak Kwong Au, Councillor of Richmond City, BC and Chair of Stop Racism Alliance. Professionally trained as a family therapist, Chak was an assistant professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong before moving to Canada in 1988. He has been the Program Leader of the Family and Children Counselling Team of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority in Richmond for over 20 years.

As a strong advocate of multiculturalism and racial harmony, he assisted and co-founded many local organizations, including the Community Mental Wellness Association of Canada, Richmond GreenSpace Society, Interfaith for World Peace Society and the Canadian International Education Assistance Foundation. In 2019, he co-founded the Stop Racism Alliance Society in response to the rise of racism and hate crime in the community.

He has served on numerous boards and committees, including the Richmond Intercultural Advisory Committee, Richmond Child Care Advisory Committee, Richmond Sister City Committee, Richmond Multicultural Concerns Society, and Richmond Poverty Response Task Force. He was elected a School Trustee from 1999 to 2011 and served twice as the Vice-Chairperson of the Richmond Board of Education.

In 2006, he was recognized by Vancouver Sun as one of The Hundred Most Influential Chinese-Canadians in BC and received the provincial award of Stand Up and Stand Out for Children and Youth in 2007. In 2012, he was a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Award. In 2014, he received the Community Champion Special Award from the federal Canadian Racial Relations Foundation on behalf of the Interfaith for World Peace Society, which he co-founded.

Alison Dudley is the Executive Director of the Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Division at the BC Ministry of Attorney General. She works on the territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil Waututh) peoples.  The Division oversees the Resilience BC Anti-Racism Network that was launched in collaboration with community partners across the province in 2019. The division has recently undertaken a province-wide public education campaign on racism, and is currently working on introducing a racist incident hotline and new anti-racism legislation.

Steven Ngo, Senior Counsel, Visier, Inc. and Victim’s Rights Advocate (BC)
Steven Ngo is a corporate/technology lawyer and currently works as senior counsel at Visier. He is the chair of the Advocacy Committee of the Vietnamese Professionals Association BC (vpabc.ca) and is Vice President (Marketing) for the Federation of Asian Canadian Lawyers BC (faclbc.ca). In addition, he is the founder of Beyond the A (beyondthea.co), an organization that seeks to destigmatize anxiety and empower lawyers to thrive in their careers.

Recently, Steven is leading a movement called Fix Police Reporting that seeks to remove barriers to reporting hate crimes to the police (fixpolicereporting.ca). He has featured throughout national and international media including The Guardian, The Globe and Mail, Vancouver Sun, CBC and various language-specific outlets for the Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipino, Japanese and South Asian communities.

Presentation by Steven Ngo, Chair of the Vietnamese Professionals Association of BC Advocacy Committee on 11/18/2021
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1P4K9Fx0JSZLNJUZntxCW3lQKl9FWnXck0J_lA2ltPOs/edit?usp=sharing

Trevor Shaw is the Director of Criminal Appeals and Special Prosecutions, BC Prosecution Service, British Columbia Ministry of Attorney General. He was counsel for the AGBC in the Cody case, decided by the Supreme Court of Canada in the aftermath of Jordan. He is a graduate of Queen’s University and the University of Paris II (Pantheon-Assas). He was a law clerk at the Ontario Court (General Division) and the Supreme Court of Canada before becoming a prosecutor in 1995 with Crown Law Office-Criminal in Toronto. He moved to British Columbia in 2006. In 2011, he worked as a consultant for the Office of Legal Affairs, at INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon, France. With the Justice Education Society, he works on a regular basis with judges and prosecutors in Central America to improve their criminal justice systems.

Corporal Anthony Statham, RCMP BC Hate Crimes, E Division Major Crimes Section

Dr. Stanislav Vysotsky is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of the Fraser Valley. Dr. Vysotsky’s research began with analysis of supremacist movements with a focus on internal dynamics, subcultural activity, and online discourse. His research agenda later expanded to include analysis of the relationship between threat, space, subculture, and the social movement activism of the antifascist movement with an eye toward its interplay with its far-right opposition. This work has been published in journals such as Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements, Critical Criminology, and the book American Antifa: The Tactics, Culture, and Practice of Militant Antifascism published by Routledge. He has also published research on far-right and supremacist movements in the Journal of Political and Military Sociology, Journal of Crime and Justice, Journal of Hate Studies, as well as several edited volumes. He is currently in the early stages of a long-term research project on the emotional labor of engaging in activism against and scholarship on the far-right.

Dr. Vincent Cheng Yang is a Senior Associate of ICCLR.  He earned a Ph.D. in Criminology from SFU in 1996 and a LL.M in Shanghai in 1984. Before his return to Canada and rejoined ICCLR in 2018, he was Professor of Law, Pro-Rector and Vice Rector at University of Saint Joseph in Macau. From 1984 to 2018, he taught law and criminal justice in several universities in mainland China and Macau. He was called to the Bar in Shanghai in 1985 and practiced law in China from 1985-1990. Prof. Yang has been vigorously working on the promotion international standards and the sharing of Canadian best practices to protect human rights and uphold the rule of law in criminal justice overseas since 1995. He was China Program Director at ICCLR during 1995-2010, Advisor for the Canadian Bar Association in 2003-2006, International Expert for the UN Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights in 2002-2005, expert member of the Government of Canada delegation to the Canada-China Human Rights Dialogues, UNDP instructor for its legal aid training project in China and corrections law project in Vietnam, visiting scholar in Cambridge University in 1986-1987 and 1990, and is recognized by the Federal Court of Canada and Immigration and Refugee Board as an expert of Chinese criminal law. In Vancouver, he is board member of Stop Racism Alliance and has often talked to the Chinese Canadian community and the press on issues of anti-Asian hate crime in recent years.

To learn more, we welcome you to read the Bibliography on Addressing Hate Crimes and Victims’ Rights.

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash.

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